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IoT, IPv6, Dislike, Opinions, NoSQL injection, Windows Server 2016 memory compression

posted May 27, 2017, 11:01 PM by Sami Lehtinen   [ updated May 27, 2017, 11:02 PM ]
  • People seem to love IoT and all the pervasive monitoring it brings. Automated IoT devices monitoring your driving habits and tracking where you go all the time. What's strange, people really love it. Why? Well, because they get large discount on car insurance. This development was pretty expected and will lead to total loss of privacy for most people in future. Yet as said. The mobile phone was first monitoring and tracking device which got widely accepted by population. They loved it, so it's pretty obvious other monitoring & tracking will be also gladly accepted. Even funnier is that people are ready to pay large sums and often update their tracking devices to the latest version. - Same applies to the social networks, people are happy and eager to report everything they do directly to intelligence agencies. And they love it. - Great.
  • Even more IPv6 fun. It seems that some routes between Finland and Central European data center we're using are nicely looping via New York and Chicago. Honestly, this is daily WTF stuff. Instead of getting around 36 ms latency, we're getting neat 152 ms. Oh joy!
  • Be careful about what you dislike.- Great post! So true. As I've said, you've gotta be flexible. If you disliked or liked something in past, it might not mean you might dislike or like it in future. Especially when your personal views as well as other factors change. We've just talked today about adequate quality at work again. Doing things too well is expensive and wastes resources. Doing things badly, is even more expensive and leads to all kind of resource loss on multiple levels as well as internal conflict, loss of motivation and other nasty stuff. But it's very hard to get the quality just right. Also same thing might be viewed completely differently depending on your own position on the argument. Even if I prefer 'neutral' and 'generalized' view, which acknowledges both parties and complete overview. Also your position and role might make having some opinions officially impossible. Because it isn't just your task or job. But hey, we all know that. CEO of oil company just can't say certain things about oil, energy or environment. That's part of the job.
  • I thought data is data, and instructions are instructions. Today I just first time saw new word with really made me laugh. NoSQL injection. - Ouch!
  • More discussion about IPv6 issues, 6rd and 6to4. Yes, unfortunately not all provides provide native IPv6 or even bother to run 6rd.
Friend claimed that Windows 2016 Server doesn't use Memory Compression. Well, it does support Memory Compression and it can be trivially enabled using PowerShell.
PS C:\Users\Administrator> Get-MMAgent

ApplicationLaunchPrefetching : False
ApplicationPreLaunch         : False
MaxOperationAPIFiles         : 256
MemoryCompression            : False
OperationAPI                 : False
PageCombining                : False
PSComputerName               :


Let's "fix" that, in case we conclude it's better to use memory compression, than add more memory or to use swapping.

PS C:\Users\Administrator> Enable-MMAgent -mc
PS C:\Users\Administrator> Get-MMAgent

ApplicationLaunchPrefetching : False
ApplicationPreLaunch         : False
MaxOperationAPIFiles         : 256
MemoryCompression            : True
OperationAPI                 : False
PageCombining                : False
PSComputerName               :


That's it. Now memory compression is enabled, and this reduces amount of data being swapped to to disk.
kw: enable memory compression Windows Server 2016, swap compression, data compression.

For comparison same info with latest Windows 10 desktop.

PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> Get-MMAgent

ApplicationLaunchPrefetching : True
ApplicationPreLaunch         : True
MaxOperationAPIFiles         : 256
MemoryCompression            : True
OperationAPI                 : True
PageCombining                : True
PSComputerName               :


Of course this comes once again to the balance of storage I/O, RAM, CPU etc. Compression can be amazing or disaster, depending on so many factors. There's no magic way to tell if it's good or bad. It depends on combination of so many different factors.

So it's just like zram or zswap on Linux, it's inherently there, but not enabled by default. Also see: compcache