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Capacity planning, utilization, Big Data, Oscobo, MemComp, ECDH, IPv6, RDBMS, IPFS, Hybrid War

posted Apr 23, 2016, 11:55 PM by Sami Lehtinen   [ updated Apr 23, 2016, 11:55 PM ]
  • Lot of discussion about capacity planning - and capacity target utilization.
  • Big Data, Privacy and The Dark Side of Big Data. Nothing, but a good compilation of current issues & topics. Isn't it classic that "Anything you say can and will be used against you", so anything you do or have done, can and will be used against you in era of big data. Do you know who got your digital finger prints? Anyway, great article. I don't have anything to add. I really liked the observations that even if I wouldn't personally leak my info, someone else will probably do it for me. - Thank you for doing that.
  • Article about Oscobo, Britain's first anonymous search engine.
  • Checked out something different: ACTUV.
  • SafeCurves - Excellent site about ECC security and known issues with different curves.
  • Watched 32c3 talk about IPFS and also wrote comments about P2P (direct every peer to every peer) vs decentralized (federated model) vs Mesh (distributed) networking networking.
  • Windows 10 memory compression - No surprises there, basic stuff.
  • Something different: Brahmos, LRASM, Klub (3M-54E1), XASM-3, AirMule, S-500 Missile System.
  • Watched a documentary about underground Internet gambling, in dark nets and what kind of businesses are revolving about dark nets and Bitcoin.
  • ECDH Key-Extraction via Low-Bandwidth Electromagnetic Attacks - Classic TEMPEST attack. There is a reason why key systems should be shielded, now news in that sense. kw: EMSEC, COMSEC, Side-channel attack.
  • Had several new integration project meetings again. I don't get what the problem with integrations is? If there's clear logic and customer is able to pay, I don't see any problems with any integrations. The it's just some work that needs to be done. As far as I can see, there hasn't been a single failed integration project. In some cases making integration isn't feasible due to economic or political reasons and that's not a failure. It's just clear nope, can't do.
  • An interesting post about IPv6 address formats.
  • Using RDBMS as Queue or Messaging is ok - I agree with that. You should consider the project as whole. As well as adding new technology adds complexity. If you know how X things, and you add just new Y and assume it works similarly, you're going to quite likely fail. Then you quickly add some patch code, which also fails, etc. Sometimes it's just amazing how many bugs you can fit in small code when using additional libraries or technologies which you really don't know or understand. I just assumed how it works, boom. That's it, massive fail.
  • Great discussion about IPFS on Hacker News. It seems that most interested about IPFS are people who don't get what it is. Nor they do get that it's nothing new. Content addressable networks are not a new invention at all. As well as there are many networks which work using content addressing. As example Freenet and GNUnet. There are pros and there are cons with content addressing. I've written lot about content addressable networks and there are aspects which I really like. What I do not like is the bleep bleep hype bleep factor which IPFS is riding on. I just hate all kind of bleep projects. How about just telling what it is, without adding bleep loads of bleep as well as misleading lies and false claims. There's also the Tahoe-LAFS out there. The main problem with these systems is that 'everyone expects someone to host the content'. Which of course won't often happen and well, that's pretty much end of the story. ED2K is / was also distributed content addressing solution just like magnets are for Bittorrent files. I do still have the old Sharereactor dump. But guess what, any of those links won't have any value to you, because the content just isn't available anymore. Same stuff is very evident with torrents and just so many other similar platforms. - My comments about all that discussion: "Just pointing out that GNUnet and Freenet both allow pretty much similar feature set. I've studied both extensively, and after checking out IPFS, I don't get what's new. Except all the 'hype' around it, which is generally something which I as tech nerd dislike. Another problem with distributed solutions is often performance, some tasks just become surprisingly expensive."
  • Some notes about hybrid war:
    • Cyber Attacks
    • Pressuring using several methods
    • Surprising on all fronts
    • Politics
    • Economy
    • Covert operations
    • Random independent happenings
    • Quick strategic attacks
    • Hiding attacker identity using indirect methods
    • Hard to know if events are independent and random
    • Using refugees as weapon
    • Disturbing internal integrity
    • Buying land and property near strategic targets where equipment and special troops can live ordinarily right before attack
    • Strategic targets: traffic, communications, water, military, electric network, key decision makers and key system maintenance and administration
    • Repeated testing of preparedness and response times